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Nasa Hubble Space Telescope Finds First Evidence Of Water Vapour On Jupiter Moon Ganymede

World Desk, Amar Ujala, Washington

Published by: Sanjeev Kumar Jha
Updated Wed, 28 Jul 2021 12:55 AM IST

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Summary

Nasa Hubble Space Telescope finds first evidence of water vapor on Jupiter moon Ganymede

NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope
– Photo: Nasa.gov

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NASA has got an important link between the possibilities of finding life on other planets of space. In fact, NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope in its search informed about the evidence of water vapor on Jupiter’s moon Ganymede.

According to research published on Monday (July 26) in Nature Astronomy General, the water vapor was in the form of gas, but after colliding with the surface of the Moon, it turned into ice. Significantly, in its previous research, NASA had described Ganymede as the largest moon in the Solar System, which was said to have more water than all the oceans on Earth. According to the US space agency, the temperature here is very low, due to which ice remains frozen on the upper surface of the water.

NASA’s research said that Ganymede’s seas are about 160 km below the surface, due to which the evaporation of sea water is very low. Significantly, Hubble monitored Ganymede for nearly two decades and gathered evidence of the process of water vaporization.

In 1998, Hubble’s Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph captured the first ultraviolet image of Ganymede, in which Ganymede’s magnetic field was reported to be weak. The presence of molecular oxygen was reported from these ultraviolet images. However, during some investigations, the presence of pure oxygen in the atmosphere was not confirmed. Scientists attributed this difference to the higher concentration of atomic oxygen.

Expansion

NASA has got an important link between the possibilities of finding life on other planets of space. In fact, NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope in its search informed about the evidence of water vapor on Jupiter’s moon Ganymede.

According to research published on Monday (July 26) in Nature Astronomy General, the water vapor was in the form of gas, but after colliding with the surface of the Moon, it turned into ice. Significantly, in its previous research, NASA had described Ganymede as the largest moon in the Solar System, which was said to have more water than all the oceans on Earth. According to the US space agency, the temperature here is very low, due to which ice remains frozen on the upper surface of the water.

NASA’s research said that Ganymede’s seas are about 160 km below the surface, due to which the evaporation of sea water is very low. Significantly, Hubble monitored Ganymede for nearly two decades and gathered evidence of the process of water vaporization.

In 1998, Hubble’s Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph captured the first ultraviolet image of Ganymede, in which Ganymede’s magnetic field was reported to be weak. The presence of molecular oxygen was reported from these ultraviolet images. However, during some investigations, the presence of pure oxygen in the atmosphere was not confirmed. Scientists attributed this difference to the higher concentration of atomic oxygen.

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