China Persecution On Uyghurs Overseas As Spread To Nearly 30 Countries

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abstract

The methods China uses to intimidate Uighurs living in other countries range from spyware and hacking to issuing red notices from Interpol against targeted individuals.

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A new report claims that China’s persecution of Uighurs living abroad has spread to 30 countries of the world. The reason for this has been attributed to the fear of Beijing’s power and influence by the governments of these countries.

This report by Vice of America (VOA) states that 28 of these countries are also involved in the harassment and intimidation of Chinese Uighurs.

Titled ‘No space left to run, China’s transnational representation of Uyghur’, the report is jointly produced by rights group Oxus Society for Central Asian on Uyghur human rights.

According to it, the methods China uses to intimidate Uighurs living in other countries include spyware and hacking to issuing red notices from Interpol against targeted individuals.

China has adopted this method since 2017 to quell foreign discontent. It also includes threats to expatriate Uighurs to detain their relatives living across Chinese borders. Bradley Jordin, research director of the Oxus Society and one of the report authors, provided this information to the VOA via email.

No legal protection in Pak, Turkey, Saudi, Turkey
Bradley Jordin, research director of the Oxus Society, said most of the Uighurs targeted by China are living in other Muslim-majority countries, including Pakistan, Egypt, Saudi Arabia and Turkey. He pointed out that in some of these countries there is even no legal protection for vulnerable minorities. For this reason, the countries of the Middle East have become fertile ground for China’s global threat campaign.

In 1997, Pakistan sent 14 Uighurs back to China, where they were killed.
The first such case was reported in Pakistan in 1997. At that time, the government of Pakistan had sent 14 Uighur Muslims to Beijing. These Muslims were accused by China of being separatists. The VOA reported that all of them were executed upon arrival in China. Whereas Pakistan took this step in friendship with China.

Detailed

A new report claims that China’s persecution of Uighurs living abroad has spread to 30 countries of the world. The reason for this has been attributed to the fear of Beijing’s power and influence by the governments of these countries.

This report by Vice of America (VOA) states that 28 of these countries are also involved in the harassment and intimidation of Chinese Uighurs.

Titled ‘No space left to run, China’s transnational representation of Uyghur’, the report is jointly produced by rights group Oxus Society for Central Asian on Uyghur human rights.

According to it, the methods China uses to intimidate Uighurs living in other countries include spyware and hacking to issuing red notices from Interpol against targeted individuals.

China has adopted this method since 2017 to quell foreign discontent. It also includes threats to expatriate Uighurs to detain their relatives living across Chinese borders. Bradley Jordin, research director of the Oxus Society and one of the report authors, provided this information to the VOA via email.

No legal protection in Pak, Turkey, Saudi, Turkey

Bradley Jordin, research director of the Oxus Society, said most of the Uighurs targeted by China are living in other Muslim-majority countries, including Pakistan, Egypt, Saudi Arabia and Turkey. He pointed out that in some of these countries there is even no legal protection for vulnerable minorities. For this reason, the countries of the Middle East have become fertile ground for China’s global threat campaign.

In 1997, Pakistan sent 14 Uighurs back to China, where they were killed.

The first such case was reported in Pakistan in 1997. At that time, the government of Pakistan had sent 14 Uighur Muslims to Beijing. These Muslims were accused by China of being separatists. The VOA reported that all of them were executed upon arrival in China. Whereas Pakistan took this step in friendship with China.

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